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2017 Top 20 Best Fleets to Drive For

The Truckload Carriers Association (TCA) and CarriersEdge announced this year’s 20 Best Fleets to Drive For in 2017 list. The fleets are recognized for providing exemplary work environments for their drivers and other employees.

The 2017 Top 20 Best Fleets to Drive For include:

  • Bison Transport, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • Boyle Transportation, Billerica, Massachusetts
  • Central Oregon Trucking Company, Inc., Redmond, Oregon
  • Challenger Motor Freight Inc., Cambridge, Ontario, Canada
  • Fremont Contract Carriers, Inc., Fremont, Nebraska
  • FTC Transportation, Inc., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Garner Trucking, Inc., Findlay, Ohio
  • Grand Island Express, Inc., Grand Island, Nebraska
  • Halvor Lines, Inc., Superior, Wisconsin
  • Interstate Distributor Co., Tacoma, Washington
  • Kriska Holdings Ltd., Prescott, Ontario, Canada
  • Landstar System, Inc., Jacksonville, Florida
  • Maverick Transportation, LLC, North Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Motor Carrier Service, LLC, Northwood, Ohio
  • Nussbaum Transportation, Hudson, Illinois
  • ONE For Freight, Milton, Ontario, Canada
  • Prime Inc., Springfield, Missouri
  • Smokey Point Distributing, Arlington, Washington
  • TLD Logistics Services, Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee
  • TransPro Freight Systems Ltd., Milton, Ontario, Canada

Two companies, FTC Transportation, Inc., and Halvor Lines, Inc., achieved the milestone of five consecutive years on the Best Fleets list. Motor Carrier Service, LLC, Fremont Contract Carriers, Inc., Landstar System, Inc., and Grand Island Express, Inc. have continued their streaks as Best Fleets, each appearing on the list for over the fifth time.

Five companies were identified as “Fleets to Watch” – honorable mentions for demonstrating innovation in their driver programs:

  • Crete Carrier Corp., Lincoln, Nebraska
  • Hirschbach Motor Lines, Inc., Dubuque, Iowa
  • Kroon Brothers Transport, LLC, Hanover, Pennsylvania
  • Paper Transport, Inc., De Pere, Wisconsin
  • Transport Corporation of America, Inc., Eagan, Minnesota

Phase two of the contest will divide the highest scoring fleets into small and large fleet categories, from which two overall winners will be selected. These awards are sponsored by EpicVue of Salt Lake City, and Bose Ride of Framingham, Massachusetts.

The overall winners’ names will be announced during TCA’s Annual Convention, March 26-29, at the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center in Nashville, Tennessee.

To make it into the runnings for the Best Fleets to Drive For in 2017, companies with 10 or more trucks had to receive a nomination from at least one of its owner-operators or company drivers. CarriersEdge also interviewed HR representatives and executives to determine the carriers that scored highest in various categories including health benefits, pensions plans, professional development, compensation, and other criteria.

Are you interested in driving for one of these top companies? Apply to Progressive Truck Driving School to learn how.

 

Seriously Skilled Truck Driver

Check out the turning skills by this truck driver! Are you interested in earning your CDL and seeing if you can make this turn? Apply to Progressive Truck Driving School.

New Study Confirms That Veterans Make for Great Truck Drivers

Independent research conducted by Omnitracs confirms that veterans make for excellent truck drivers. The data revealed a few key data points: for instance veterans had 42 percent fewer accidents than non-veteran drivers, veterans achieved 98 percent more miles driven, and veterans had 59 percent fewer voluntary terminations and 68 percent fewer involuntary terminations.

According to the study, veterans’ trucking skill and job dedication can be at least partially attributed to the skill sets that the military brings, such as discipline and understanding of policy and procedures.

“The biggest thing is that the parallels between the trucking industry and the military life are right on point in that veterans are used to being away from home. Their families are used to them being away from home, so on the family side, they have everything in place to handle it when the service member’s away or the professional driver is away from home,” said Rick Bucholtz, associate director of field and government recruiting, Werner Enterprises. “Also, being out on the road, they work under minimal supervision. They’re out there on their own. They have to be able to make decisions. They have to be able to assess and take action without being told exactly what to do”

Here at Progressive Truck Driving School, we pride ourselves on training our veterans and helping them to jump-start their career after the military. We offer veterans assistance, including tuition assistance programs through the Workforce Investment Act (WIA). You can learn more here.

To apply to Progressive Truck Driving School, please complete this application.

Things to Know When Truck Driving With a Pet

Many drivers consider themselves lucky to work for a company that offered a pet policy. Bringing pets along in the cab can be an excellent way to combat isolation on the road, as well as giving drivers the opportunity to get out of the truck every now and then to stretch their legs. Many drivers report feeling a greater sense of mental health while trucking with their cat or dog, and find that the job is more meaningful when trucking with an animal.

While it certainly is a perk for drivers to have the ability to bring along their four-legged friends, one must consider the potential safety concerns that accompany a pet passenger. Even the most obedient and well-mannered animals may find some difficulty in traveling for long distances. With that in mind, it’s crucial that drivers take into consideration some key factors when deciding on taking their animals along for the ride.

Feel Confident And Experienced Before Bringing A Pet Along

Many trucking sources recommend that drivers who are considering taking a pet along ought to have some verifiable level of driving experience. Those with experience under their belts are less likely to be distracted by animals in the cab and generally find that should any problems arise while transporting an animal, they have some practical knowledge to fall back upon. Drivers with little experience are discouraged from riding with their pets as to stay focused and to avoid any potential hazards.

Provide a Safe and Comfortable Restraint

Most dogs, if not all dogs, love the feeling of poking their head out the window and taking in the fresh air of the highway. Allowing pets to roam inside may also prove problematic, as they may accidentally hit some cab features or hinder the driver from performing as attentively as possible. Drivers are encouraged to secure their pets in a comfortable yet secure harness or restraint system so that they stay put in a location while simultaneously feeling comfortable in their seat.

Keep Supplies On Hand For Both Passengers

Should an accident or layover prevent a driver from reaching their anticipated destination, it’s important they have emergency food and water on board. However, your pet will also require food and water in the case of an emergency. Drivers should be sure to stock up on extra emergency rations in the event of a stop. When traveling with two passengers – even if one is an animal – it’s always better to overstock than to be understocked.

Bringing a pet along on the road is a terrific opportunity for drivers to have a meaningful and fulfilling experience in trucking. By ensuring a pet’s safety, drivers can then better ensure the safety of everyone sharing the road.

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Guest Author Bio: Jake is a professional journalist living in Los Angeles who has his hands in many different arenas of writing. In addition to working as a copywriter and holding a position as a member of the marketing team for TruckDrivingJobs.com, Jake also frequently submits articles to entertainment publications and enjoys participating in podcasts on nearly any subject.

July 21st Webinar: “Economic Outlook: A Guide for Driver Engagement, Workforce Development and Business Opportunities”

On July 21, 2016, the Truckload Carriers Association is presenting a webinar: “Economic Outlook: A Guide for Driver Engagement, Workforce Development and Business Opportunities.” We invite anyone interested in this topic to view the webinar.

“For every mile-per-hour drop in speed, America needs an additional 67,000 drivers just to move the same amount of freight,” says FTR Chairman and CEO Eric Starks.  “This is a startling fact given that regulations will constrain driver availability over the next few years,” he continues.

Discover how driver recruitment and retention could be impacted by federal regulations, economic conditions and the lack of a well-maintained highway infrastructure during the Truckload Academy webinar, The Economic Outlook: A Guide for Driver Engagement, Workforce Development and Business Opportunities, Thursday, July 21, 12-1:30 p.m. ET.  Starks will explore these issues as well as the impact of technologies on the trucking industry and share what carriers should plan for in the months ahead.

For other topics covered in this Truckload Academy Live Learning webinar and cost, click here to go to the event homepage.

Please register here and plan to attend this important educational program.  If you are a TCA member, be sure to enter your TCA log-in credentials.  If you do not know what they are, please click here to have them emailed to you.  Otherwise, click “Continue Without Login.”

You can view this session via your mobile device, your desktop computer, or in a conference room where you can invite others in your organization who will benefit from this event.

The TCA looks forward to your participation in this interactive webinar.  Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter at #TruckloadAcademy.

Sleep Apnea and Commercial Drivers: A Deadly Combination

We’re trying to spread the word about the dangers associated with untreated sleep apnea and commercial drivers so we’re featuring the guest article below from our friends at Zehl & Associates Law Firm:

There’s no question that driver fatigue poses a serious threat to safety on our nation’s roadways. But just how bad is the threat? Well, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the number of fatigue-related crashes reported to the police each year stands at a staggering 100,000, many of which involve professional drivers in heavy commercial vehicles. That means an average of 1,550 deaths, 71,000 injuries and $12.5 billion in monetary damages each year as a result of fatigue-related accidents.

That’s bad.

And the worst part is, they are all 100% avoidable.

So what is being done to prevent fatigued commercial drivers—specially licensed, professional operators of 18 wheelers, buses and other large commercial vehicles—from getting behind the wheel while they’re tired or fatigued? Well, as it turns out, not enough.

Please read the rest of this article from Zehl & Associates Law Firm…

Trucking is a New Adventure Every Day

At Progressive Truck Driving School, we train drivers for the road ahead. Once our graduates are on the road we often hear feedback about their experiences.

Something we hear often is about the new sights, sounds, and adventures are that our drivers experience once they’re on the road. For drivers that have not traveled a lot in their pre-trucking careers, they’re often excited about the opportunity to see the country, sometimes visiting four or five states in a single day. Truck drivers can leave California in the morning, and find themselves in Wyoming in the same day – that’s an experience that’s very unique to the truck driving industry.

We also hear about how our drivers love the experience of meeting a lot of different people – people that they might not have been able to meet in their prior careers. They meet interesting people in states and cities that they had never visited before. Trucking can give drivers a new perspective on people and on life in general.

Drivers tell us about unexpected, fantastic moment like seeing the sunrise in Utah or seeing Elk graze in Montana – experiences that people pay big money to vacation and see. Drivers who might not have been able to visit the coasts are able to see the Gulf and beautiful beaches.

Truckers get to see and experience things that people in other careers just aren’t able to see and do. For many of our drivers, this is the best part of choosing a career in trucking.

Complete this form to apply to Progressive Truck School!

Accuracy Is a Significant Issue With Hair Testing

The “Drug Free Commercial Truck Driver Act of 2015” is a bill that would allow the Department of Transportation to authorize hair testing instead of urinalysis.

Critics of hair testing claim that science doesn’t support hair testing, and that it’s simply not as accurate as urinalysis for detecting controlled substances by an operator.

The bill currently is receiving support from bi-partisan co-sponsors, along with support from the American Trucking Association along with some fleets.

According to Dr. Kent Peterson, president of Charlottesville, Virginia Occupational Health Strategies and Former Exec. Vice President of American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM):

“Hair testing has a window of testing for the previous months or weeks. If you take one and a half inches closest to the scalp it will give an indication of drug use for the past 90 days,” he says. “Hair testing may be used for pre-employment screening to show long-term use but it gives no indication of current use or recent impairment.”

Some critics argues that hair testing unfairly biases some drivers. According to Peterson,

“Curly haired and persons of color are more likely to test positive [because they have more melanin in their hair which binds more strongly with markers]. It’s believed that if hair testing were to be used and brought to court, it would be thrown out on that basis alone.”

It will be interesting in the coming months to see if the bill will garner additional support and pass into law, as it seems that the science justifying the bill isn’t concrete.

Interested in earning your CDL? Apply to Progressive Truck School.

What is a Schneider driver?

From our friends at Schneider Trucking: Are you considering Schneider for your career after driving school? It can be hard to sift through all the different perspectives, but nobody can explain what it’s like to be a Schneider driver better than an actual Schneider driver. Read below as Schneider Team driver Sharon Nader gives her perspective.

We might drive trucks for a living, but drivers have several jobs that come with the territory and need many skills to accomplish the job. Here are just a few:

Safety Officer: A driver’s first job is safety. We represent the ability to deliver freight safely and in a timely manner while following the DOT’s rules. You are always a safety representative of Schneider and our industry, even at home. Many people are worried that the new rules will hurt their ability to deliver freight. I disagree. In my opinion, the new rules force everyone to deal with what is possible — be advocates for safety on our highways. Drivers are the most important component of success. It can’t happen without safe drivers! Driver compliance, safe equipment and technology will keep Schneider on the top of the list of preferred carriers.

Customer Service Officer: Customer service is everyone’s goal. Schneider wants the shipper and the consignee to be happy with their performance. It’s just good sense and job security to want the customer to book freight repeatedly with Schneider. There is a great need to communicate equipment, routing and shipping issues or problems.

Keep in mind that we are humans, and being polite – even when hot and tired – is also a part of the job. You want your load to be safe, legal and damage-free. It can make or break business for our employer, our customers and even ourselves. Every time a problem is identified and you take the time to correct it or communicate it to the customer and Schneider, you are a customer service representative! Whether you are a good representative or a bad one is a choice you make on a daily basis.

Billing Agent: A driver who completes business by submitting paperwork helps Schneider get paid in a timely manner and ensures that the flow of business – and your pay – is uninterrupted. Accuracy is vital to the completion of a transaction. Knowledge of the business system will only improve your scorecard and get you more miles. It pays to know the system. Drivers are billing agents every time they complete a load and get that Transflo receipt!

Recruitment Officer: Here is an area that I need to improve. Did you ever have someone ask you a question about Schneider while you are cleaning your windshield or in the middle of fueling? It’s one of those “I could have had a V8!” moments! I can’t tell you how many times I have been approached and was never ready to answer the questions that were put to me. Sometimes I want to go find the person after they leave and complete the conversation.

Here are a few things I would tell them: First, I can’t imagine working for another company. Hauling freight is hard work and it can be dangerous. I want to work for Schneider because of its commitment to safety and for helping me be safer.

Secondly, I would say that Schneider’s technology has greatly improved and is continuing to get better to make my job more productive and safer. I think Schneider has the best of the best technology available.

Finally, I would say that Schneider’s equipment, especially trailers, has never been better. We have updated most of our equipment and more is on the way. From what I have seen, Schneider is concerned about driver satisfaction and they don’t just look at pay, they are trying to stay on top of all areas of business.

Find out for yourself why drivers have chosen Schneider for 80 years, explore all your opportunities and apply at schneiderjobs.com.

Why Trucking is a Safe Bet for Military Veterans

Safety isn’t just a buzzword in the trucking industry — it’s a lifestyle. It has to be, for a reason more than familiar to military veterans: neglecting safety comes with consequences. Fortunately, veterans transitioning into trucking will find a familiar — and enduring — commitment to safety. The statistics prove it.

According to the American Trucking Associations, the number of truck-involved fatalities fell 21% between 2002 and 2012 (the most recent range data is available for). The number of truck-involved injuries fell 20% during the same period. Altogether, trucks have overall crash rates almost half that of other vehicles.

The numbers are even more impressive considering in 2012 there were nearly 3 million more registered large trucks on the road than in 2002. Every day, the drivers of those trucks travel millions of miles, facing challenges like careless motorists and fluctuating weather conditions.

A combination of factors contributes to safety progress made in the industry, including better equipment and technology. Ultimately, it comes down to each driver making safety a top priority, and working for a company that never compromises that commitment.

For example, Schneider, an industry leader for 80 years and the number eight G.I. Jobs Military Friendly employer, has a core value of “safety first and always.” No freight matches the value of a human life, and Schneider’s policies reflect that.

Learn more about Schneider’s commitment to safety, see why those with a military background choose Schneider and apply to join the team by visiting schneiderjobs.com or calling 800-44-PRIDE.